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Author Kleinmann, R.L.P.
Title Biological treatment of acid mine water using engineered wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication (up) Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords acid mine drainage; biodegradation; natural resources; reclamation; surface water; wetlands 22, Environmental geology
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Publisher Annual Meeting - Association of Engineering Geologists Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Engineering geology for the 90's Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes 1991-006081; Association of Engineering Geologists, 33rd annual meeting; Engineering geology for the 90's, Pittsburgh, PA, United States, Oct. 1-5; GeoRef; English Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 6736 Serial 329
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Author Kleinmann, R.L.P.
Title Treatment of mine drainage by anoxic limestone drains and constructed wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 1998 Publication (up) Acidic Mining Lakes Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 303-319
Keywords mine water treatment
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Notes Treatment of mine drainage by anoxic limestone drains and constructed wetlands; Isip:000078867600016; Times Cited: 0; ISI Web of Science Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 8621 Serial 179
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Author Hedin, R.S.; Nairn, R.W.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.
Title Passive Treatment of Coal Mine Drainage Type Journal Article
Year 1994 Publication (up) Bureau of Mines Information Circular Abbreviated Journal
Volume Ic-9389 Issue Pages 1-35
Keywords wetland Grubenwasser treatment Wasserreinigung Wasserbehandlung mine water
Abstract Passive methods of treating mine water utilize chemical and biological processes that decrease metal concentrations and neutralize acidity. Compared to conventional chemical treatment, passive methods generally require more land area, but utilize less costly reagents and require less operational attention and maintenance. Currently, three types of passive technologies exist: aerobic wetlands, wetlands that contain an organic substrate, and anoxic limestone drains. Aerobic wetlands promote mixed oxidation and hydrolysis reactions, and are most effective when the raw mine water is net alkaline. Organic substrate wetlands promote anaerobic bacterial activity that results in the precipitation of metal sulfides and the generation of bicarbonate alkalinity. Anoxic limestone drains generate bicarbonate alkalinity and can be useful for the pretreatment of mine water before it flows into a wetland. Rates of metal and acidity removal for passive systems have been developed empirically. Aerobic wetlands remove Fe and Mn from alkaline water at rates of 10-20 g×m-2×d-1 and 0.5-1.0 g×m-2×d-1, respectively.
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ISSN 0096-1914 ISBN Medium
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Notes Passive Treatment of Coal Mine Drainage; 1; abgegeben an TUFG 100700 / 0 13 Abb., 19 Tab.; AMD ISI | Wolkersdorfer Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17474 Serial 355
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Author Kleinmann, R.L.P.
Title Acid Mine Water Treatment using Engineered Wetlands Type Journal Article
Year 1990 Publication (up) Int. J. Mine Water Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue 1-4 Pages 269-276
Keywords wetlands AMD passive treatment pollution control water treatment abandoned mines biological treatment pH bacterial oxidation wetland sizing sphagnum
Abstract 400 systems installed within 4 years During the last two decades, the United States mining industry has greatly increased the amount it spends on pollution control. The application of biotechnology to mine water can reduce the industry's water treatment costs (estimated at over a million dollars a day) and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water draining from abandoned mines. Biological treatment of mine waste water is typically conducted in a series of small excavated ponds that resemble, in a superficial way, a small marsh area. The ponds are engineered to first facilitate bacterial oxidation of iron; ideally, the water then flows through a composted organic substrate that supports a population of sulfate-reducing bacteria. The latter process raises the pH. During the past four years, over 400 wetland water treatment systems have been built on mined lands as a result of research by the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In general, mine operators find that the wetlands reduce chemical treatment costs enough to repay the cost of wetland construction in less than a year. Actual rates of iron removal at field sites have been used to develop empirical sizing criteria based on iron loading and pH. If the pH is 6 or above, the wetland area (in2) required is equivalent to the iron. load (grams/day) divided by 10. Theis requirement doubles at a pH of 4 to 5. At a pH below 4, the iron load (grams/day) should be divided by 2 to estimate the area required (in2).
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ISSN 0255-6960 ISBN Medium
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Notes Acid Mine Water Treatment using Engineered Wetlands; 1; Fg; AMD ISI | Wolkersdorfer Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17368 Serial 328
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Author Perry, A.; Kleinmann, R.L.P.
Title The use of constructed wetlands in the treatment of acid mine drainage Type Journal Article
Year 1991 Publication (up) Natural Resources Forum Abbreviated Journal
Volume 15 Issue 3 Pages 178-184
Keywords quality standard water treatment constructed wetland pond system acid mine drainage USA 1 Geography
Abstract US government regulations require that all effluents from industrial operations, including mining, meet certain water quality standards. Constructed wetlands have proven to be useful in helping to attain those standards. Application of this biotechnology to mine water drainage can reduce water treatment costs and improve water quality in streams and rivers adversely affected by acidic mine water drainage from abandoned mines. Over 400 constructed wetland water treatment systems have been built on mined lands largely as a result of research by the US Bureau of Mines. Wetlands are passive biological treatment systems that are relatively inexpensive to construct and require minimal maintenance. Chemical treatment costs are reduced sufficiently to repay the cost of construction in less than a year. The mine waste water is typically treated in a series of excavated ponds that resemble small marsh areas. The ponds are engineered to facilitate bacterial oxidation of iron. Ideally, the water then flows through a composted organic substrate supporting a population of sulphate-reducing bacteria which raises the pH. Constructed wetlands in the US are described – their history, functions, construction methodologies, applicabilities, limitations and costs. -Authors
Address US Department of the Interior, Bureau of Mines, 2401 E Street, NW Washington, DC 20241, USA
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Notes The use of constructed wetlands in the treatment of acid mine drainage; (0895945); 92h-01979; Using Smart Source Parsing pp; Geobase Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17569 Serial 272
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