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Author Faulkner, B.B.; Skousen, J.G.; Skousen, J.G.; Ziemkiewicz, P.F.
Title Treatment of acid mine drainage by passive treatment systems Type Book Chapter
Year 1996 Publication Acid mine drainage control and treatment Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords acid mine drainage; acidification; alkalinity; carbonate rocks; chemical reactions; constructed wetlands; controls; depositional environment; ground water; heavy metals; limestone; microorganisms; pollution; sedimentary rocks; substrates; surface water; techniques; United States; water pollution; water treatment; West Virginia; wetlands 22, Environmental geology
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Publisher West Virginia University and the National Mine Land Reclamation Center Place of Publication Morgantown Editor
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Notes Treatment of acid mine drainage by passive treatment systems; GeoRef; English; 2004-051153; Edition: 2 References: 13; illus. incl. 4 tables Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 6363 Serial 384
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Author Fisher, T.S.R.; Lawrence, G.A.
Title Treatment of acid rock drainage in a meromictic mine pit lake Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Journal of environmental engineering Abbreviated Journal
Volume 132 Issue 4 Pages 515-526
Keywords Pollution and waste management non radioactive Groundwater problems and environmental effects geological abstracts: environmental geology (72 14 2) geomechanics abstracts: excavations (77 10 10) meromictic lake acid mine drainage mine waste copper water pollution Bacteria microorganisms Canada Vancouver Island British Columbia North America
Abstract The Island Copper Mine pit near Port Hardy, Vancouver Island, B.C., Canada, was flooded in 1996 with seawater and capped with fresh water to form a meromictic (permanently stratified) pit lake of maximum depth 350 m and surface area 1.72 km2. The pit lake is being developed as a treatment system for acid rock drainage. The physical structure and water quality has developed into three distinct layers: a brackish and well-mixed upper layer; a plume stirred intermediate layer; and a thermally convecting lower layer. Concentrations of dissolved metals have been maintained well below permit limits by fertilization of the surface waters. The initial mine closure plan proposed removal of heavy metals by metal-sulfide precipitation via anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacteria, once anoxic conditions were established in the intermediate and lower layers. Anoxia has been achieved in the lower layer, but oxygen consumption rates have been less than initially predicted, and anoxia has yet to be achieved in the intermediate layer. If anoxia can be permanently established in the intermediate layer then biogeochemical removal rates may be high enough that fertilization may no longer be necessary. < copyright > 2006 ASCE.
Address Prof. G.A. Lawrence, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada lawrence@civil.ubc.ca
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ISSN 0733-9372 ISBN Medium
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Notes Apr.; Treatment of acid rock drainage in a meromictic mine pit lake; 2873922; United-States 38; Geobase Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17494 Serial 72
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Author Greben, H.A.; Matshusa, M.P.; Maree, J.P.
Title Type Book Whole
Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 339-345
Keywords water pollution biological Sulphate removal technology sulphate acidity metals treatment technique
Abstract Mining is implicated as a significant contributor to water pollution, the prime reason being, that pyrites oxidize to sulphuric acid when exposed to air and water. Mine effluents, often containing sulphate, acidity and metals, should be treated to render it suitable for re-use in the mining industry, for irrigation of crops or for discharge in water bodies. This study describes the removal of all three mentioned pollutants in mine effluents, from different origins, containing different concentrations of various metals. The objectives were achieved, applying the biological sulphate removal technology, using ethanol as the carbon and energy source. It was shown that diluting the mine effluent with the effluent from the biological treatment, the pH increased due to the alkalinity in the treated water while the metals precipitated with the produced sulphide. When this treatment regime was changed and the mine water was fed undiluted, it was found that the metals stimulated the methanogenic bacteria (MB) as trace elements. This resulted in a high COD utilization of the MB, such that too little COD was available for the SRB. Metal removal in all three studies was observed and in most instances the metals were eliminated to the required disposal concentration.
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Publisher University of Oviedo Place of Publication Oviedo Editor Loredo, J.; Pendás, F.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Mine Water 2005 Mine Closure Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 84-689-3415-1 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes The biological Sulphate removal technology; 1; AMD ISI | Wolkersdorfer; FG 'aha' 3 Abb., 9 Tab. Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17347 Serial 367
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Author Herbert, R.B., Jr.; Benner, S.G.; Blowes, D.W.
Title Reactive barrier treatment of groundwater contaminated by acid mine drainage; sulphur accumulation and sulphide formation Type Book Chapter
Year 1998 Publication Groundwater Quality: Remediation and Protection Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 451-457
Keywords acid mine drainage Canada chemical analysis contaminant plumes Eastern Canada ground water hydraulic conductivity hydrolysis Nickel Rim Mine Ontario pH pollution porosity pyrrhotite remediation sample preparation Sudbury Basin sulfides sulfur tailings water pollution 22, Environmental geology
Abstract A permeable reactive barrier was installed in August 1995 at the Nickel Rim Mine near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada, for the passive remediation of groundwater contaminated with acid mine drainage. The reactive component of the barrier consists of a mixture of municipal and leaf compost and wood chips: the organic material promotes bacterially-mediated sulphate reduction. Hydrogen sulphide, a product of sulphate reduction, may then complex with aqueous ferrous iron and precipitate as iron sulphide. This study presents the solid phase sulphur chemistry of the reactive wall after two years of operation, and discusses the formation and accumulation of iron sulphide minerals in the reactive material. The results from the solid-phase chemical analysis of core samples indicate that there is an accumulation of reduced inorganic sulphur in the reactive wall, with levels reaching 190 mu mol g (super -1) (dry weight) by July 1997.
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Publisher IAHS-AISH Publication, vol.250 Place of Publication Editor Herbert, M.; Kovar, K.
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ISSN ISBN 1901502554 Medium
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Notes Reactive barrier treatment of groundwater contaminated by acid mine drainage; sulphur accumulation and sulphide formation; GeoRef; English; 1999-065115; GQ 98 conference, Tubingen, Federal Republic of Germany, Sept. 21-24, 1998 References: 15; illus. Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 16621 Serial 65
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Author Hulshof, A.H.M.; Blowes, D.W.; Douglas Gould, W.
Title Evaluation of in situ layers for treatment of acid mine drainage: A field comparison Type Journal Article
Year 2006 Publication Water Res Abbreviated Journal
Volume 40 Issue 9 Pages 1816-1826
Keywords mine water Pollution and waste management non radioactive Groundwater problems and environmental effects acid mine drainage organic carbon oxidation microbial activity drainage groundwater pollution Bacteria microorganisms Contamination Groundwater Barriers Drainage Treatment
Abstract Reactive treatment layers, containing labile organic carbon, were evaluated to determine their ability to promote sulfate reduction and metal sulfide precipitation within a tailings impoundment, thereby treating tailings effluent prior to discharge. Organic carbon materials, including woodchips and pulp waste, were mixed with the upper meter of tailings in two separate test cells, a third control cell contained only tailings. In the woodchip cell sulfate reduction rates were 500 mg L-1 a-1, (5.2 mmol L-1 a-1) this was coupled with the gradual removal of 350 mg L-1 Zn (5.4 mmol L-1). Decreased δ13CDIC values from -3 to as low as -12 indicated that sulfate reduction was coupled with organic carbon oxidation. In the pulp waste cell the most dramatic change was observed near the interface between the pulp waste amended tailings and the underlying undisturbed tailings. Sulfate reduction rates were 5000 mg L-1 a-1 (52 mmol L-1 a-1), Fe concentrations decreased by 8099.5% (148 mmol L-1) and Zn was consistently <5 mg L-1. Rates of sulfate reduction and metal removal decreased as the pore water migrated upward into the shallower tailings. Increased rates of sulfate reduction in the pulp waste cell were consistent with decreased δ13CDIC values, to as low as -22, and increased populations of sulfate reducing bacteria. Lower concentrations of the nutrients, phosphorus, organic carbon and nitrogen in the woodchip material contribute to the lower sulfate reduction rates observed in the woodchip cell.
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ISSN 0043-1354 ISBN Medium
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Notes May; Evaluation of in situ layers for treatment of acid mine drainage: A field comparison; file:///C:/Dokumente%20und%20Einstellungen/Stefan/Eigene%20Dateien/Artikel/10040.pdf; Science Direct Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 10040 Serial 49
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