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Author Dempsey, B.A.; Jeon, B.-H.
Title Characteristics of sludge produced from passive treatment of mine drainage Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2001 Publication Geochem.-Explor. Environ. Anal. Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 89-94
Keywords acid mine drainage; aerobic environment; anaerobic environment; Appalachian Plateau; Appalachians; carbonate rocks; coagulation; compressibility; decontamination; density; drainage; filtration; geochemistry; Howe Bridge; Jefferson County Pennsylvania; limestone; mining geology; North America; passive systems; Pennsylvania; pH; pollution; ponds; rates; reclamation; sedimentary rocks; settling; sludge; slurries; suspended materials; United States; viscosity; wet packing density; wetlands; zeta-potential 22, Environmental geology
Abstract In the 1994 paper by Brown, Skousen & Renton it was argued that settleability and wet-packing density were the most important physical characteristics of sludge from treatment of mine drainage. These characteristics plus zeta-potential, intrinsic viscosity, specific resistance to filtration, and coefficient of compressibility were determined for several sludge samples from passive treatment sites and for several sludge samples that were prepared in the laboratory. Sludge from passive systems had high packing density, low intrinsic viscosity, low specific resistance to filtration and low coefficient of compressibility compared to sludge that was produced after addition of NaOH.
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ISSN 1467-7873 ISBN Medium
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Notes Feb.; Characteristics of sludge produced from passive treatment of mine drainage; 2002-008382; References: 29; illus. incl. 5 tables United Kingdom (GBR); GeoRef; English Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 5734 Serial 57
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Author Demchak, J.; Morrow, T.; Skousen, J.; Donovan, J.J.; Rose, A.W.
Title Treatment of acid mine drainage by four vertical flow wetlands in Pennsylvania Evolution and remediation of acid-sulfate groundwater systems at reclaimed mine-sites Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2001 Publication Geochemistry – Exploration, Environment, Analysis Abbreviated Journal
Volume 1 Issue 1 Pages 71-80
Keywords acid mine drainage alkalinity anaerobic environment Appalachian Plateau Appalachians carbonate rocks Clearfield County Pennsylvania constructed wetlands Eh equilibrium Filson Wetlands ground water Howe Bridge Wetlands hydrology Jefferson County Pennsylvania limestone McKinley Wetlands Mill Creek watershed Moose Creek movement North America passive methods Pennsylvania pH pollution reclamation sedimentary rocks Sommerville Wetlands systems United States water treatment watersheds wetlands 22 Environmental geology 02B Hydrochemistry
Abstract Acid mine drainage (AMD) is a serious problem in many watersheds where coal is mined. Passive treatments, such as wetlands and anoxic limestone drains (ALDs), have been developed, but these technologies show varying treatment efficiencies. A new passive treatment technique is a vertical flow wetland or successive alkalinity producing system (SAPS). Four SAPS in Pennsylvania were studied to determine changes in water chemistry from inflow to outflow. The Howe Bridge SAPS removed about 130 mg l (super -1) (40%) of the inflow acidity concentration and about 100 mg l (super -1) (60%) iron (Fe). The Filson 1 SAPS removed 68 mg l (super -1) (26%) acidity, 20 mg l (super -1) (83%) Fe and 6 mg l (super -1) (35%) aluminium (Al). The Sommerville SAPS removed 112 mg l (super -1) (31%) acidity, exported Fe, and removed 13 mg l (super -1) (30%) Al. The McKinley SAPS removed 54 mg l (super -1) (91%) acidity and 5 mg l (super -1) (90%) Fe. Acid removal rates at our four sites were 17 (HB), 52 (Filson1), 18 (Sommerville) and 11 (McKinley) g of acid per m (super 2) of surface wetland area per day (g/m (super 2) d (super -1) ). Calcium (Ca) concentrations in the SAPS effluents were increased between 8 and 57 mg l (super -1) at these sites. Equilibrators, which were inserted into compost layers to evaluate redox conditions at our sites, showed that reducing conditions were generally found at 60 cm compost depths and oxidized conditions were found at 30 cm compost depths. Deeply oxidized zones substantiated observations that channel flow was occurring through some parts of the compost. The Howe Bridge site has not declined in treatment efficiency over a six year treatment life. The SAPS construction costs were equal to about seven years of NaOH chemical treatment costs and 30 years of lime treatment costs. So, if the SAPS treatment longevity is seven years or greater and comparable effluent water quality was achieved, the SAPS construction was cost effective compared to NaOH chemical treatment. Construction recommendations for SAPS include a minimum of 50 cm of compost thickness, periodic replacement or addition of fresh compost material, and increasing the number of drainage pipes underlying the limestone.
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ISSN 1467-7873 ISBN Medium
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Notes Treatment of acid mine drainage by four vertical flow wetlands in Pennsylvania Evolution and remediation of acid-sulfate groundwater systems at reclaimed mine-sites; 2002-008380; References: 15; illus. incl. 5 tables United Kingdom (GBR); GeoRef; English Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 16518 Serial 58
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Author Ye, Z.H.; Whiting, S.N.; Qian, J.H.; Lytle, C.M.; Lin, Z.Q.; Terry, N.
Title Trace element removal from coal ash leachate by a 10-year-old constructed wetland Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2001 Publication J. Environ. Qual. Abbreviated Journal
Volume 30 Issue 5 Pages 1710-1719
Keywords acid mine drainage; Alabama; ash; bioaccumulation; boron; cadmium; constructed wetlands; environmental analysis; environmental effects; iron; Jackson County Alabama; Juncus effusus; leachate; manganese; metals; pH; pollutants; pollution; remediation; soils; sulfur; trace elements; Typha latifolia; United States; vegetation; waste water; wetlands; Widows Creek; Widows Creek Steam Plant; zinc; Typha; Juncus 22, Environmental geology
Abstract This study investigated the ability of a 10-yr-old constructed wetland to treat metal-contaminated leachate emanating from a coal ash pile at the Widows Creek electric utility, Alabama (USA). The two vegetated cells, which were dominated by cattail (Typha latifolia L.) and soft rush (Juncus effusus L.), were very effective at removing Fe and Cd from the wastewater, but less efficient for Zn, S, B, and Mn. The concentrations were decreased by up to 99% for Fe, 91% for Cd, 63% for Zn, 61% for S, 58% for Mn, and 50% for B. Higher pH levels (>6) in standing water substantially improved the removing efficiency of the wetland for Mn only. The belowground tissues of both cattail and soft rush had high concentrations of all elements; only for Mn, however, did the concentration in the shoots exceed those in the belowground tissues. The concentrations of trace elements in fallen litter were higher than in the living shoots, but lower than in the belowground tissues. ne trace element accumulation in the plants accounted for less than 2.5% of the annual loading of each trace element into the wetland. The sediments were the primary sinks for the elements removed from the wastewater. Except for Mn, the concentrations of trace elements in the upper layer (0-5 cm) of the sediment profile tended to be higher than the lower layers (5-10 and 10-15 cm). We conclude that constructed wetlands are still able to efficiently remove metals in the long term (i.e., >10 yr after construction).
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ISSN 0047-2425 ISBN Medium
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Notes Aug 1; Trace element removal from coal ash leachate by a 10-year-old constructed wetland; 2002-017274; References: 33; illus. incl. 2 tables United States (USA); file:///C:/Dokumente%20und%20Einstellungen/Stefan/Eigene%20Dateien/Artikel/5703.pdf; GeoRef; English Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 5703 Serial 76
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Author Ye, Z.H.
Title Removal and distribution of iron, manganese, cobalt, and nickel within a Pennsylvania constructed wetland treating coal combustion by-product leachate Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2001 Publication Journal of Environmental Quality Abbreviated Journal
Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 1464-1473
Keywords mine water treatment
Abstract A flow-through wetland treatment system was constructed to treat coal combustion by-product leachate from an electrical power station at Springdale, Pennsylvania. In a nine-compartment treatment system, four cattail (Typha latifolia L.) wetland cells (designated Cells I through 4) successfully removed iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) from the inlet water; Fe and Mn concentrations were decreased by an average of 91% in the first year (May 1996-May 1997), and by 94 and 98% in the second year (July 1997-June 1998), respectively. Cobalt (Co) and nickel (Ni) were decreased by an average of 39 and 47% in the first year, and 98 and 63% in the second year, respectively. Most of the metal removed by the wetland cells was accumulated in sediments, which constituted the largest sink. Except for Fe, metal concentrations in the sediments tended to be greater in the top 5 em of sediment than in the 5- to 10- or 10- to 15-cm layers, and in Cell I than in Cells 2, 3, and 4. Plants constituted a much smaller sink for metals; only 0.91, 4.18, 0.19, and 0.38% of the Fe, Mn, Co, and Ni were accumulated annually in the aboveground tissues of cattail, respectively. A greater proportion of each metal (except Mn) was accumulated in cattail fallen litter and submerged Chara (a macroalga) tissues, that is, 2.81, 2.75, and 1.05% for Fe, Co, and Ni, respectively. Considerably higher concentrations of metals were associated with cattail roots than shoots, although Mn was a notable exception.
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Notes Removal and distribution of iron, manganese, cobalt, and nickel within a Pennsylvania constructed wetland treating coal combustion by-product leachate; Wos:000174863000040; Times Cited: 15; ISI Web of Science Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17061 Serial 122
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Author Chung, I.J.
Title Immobilization of arsenic in tailing by using iron and hydrogen peroxide Type Journal Article
Year (up) 2001 Publication Environ. Technol. Abbreviated Journal
Volume 22 Issue 7 Pages 831-835
Keywords mine water treatment
Abstract Under environmental conditions, arsenic (As) reveals anionic behavior and is converted into various forms in accordance with the Eh/pH condition. This causes the difficulty of treating As with other heavy metals in tailing. This study was carried out to develop the immobilization method of arsenic in tailing as ferric arsenate (FeAsO4) using hydrogen peroxide. According to experimental results, the extracted concentrations of arsenic and iron (Fe) from tailing were reduced up to 84% and 93%, respectively. In the experiment using pure Pyrite (FeS2) and As solution, As concentration decreased with an increase of hydrogen peroxide dosage. The experimental results of re-extraction showed that only 10% of As and 20% of Fe were extracted in the case of using hydrogen peroxide. As a result, the long-term stability of this method was clarified.
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Notes Immobilization of arsenic in tailing by using iron and hydrogen peroxide; Wos:000170195000008; Times Cited: 0; ISI Web of Science Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17046 Serial 123
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