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Author (up) Ayala, J.; Fernández, B.
Title Type Book Whole
Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 649-654
Keywords flying ash copper cyanide gold mine tailing ponds detoxification
Abstract The objective of this study was to examine the use of flying ash to remove the copper cyanide species from gold mine effluents. In order to discharge them safely with minimum impact to the environment the effluents must be treated in such a way that the legal conditions were attained with the lowest possible cost. This paper presents the treatment of cyanide solution originating from tailing ponds at the end of detoxification by direct contact with flying ash.
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Publisher University of Oviedo Place of Publication Oviedo Editor Loredo, J.; Pendás, F.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Mine Water 2005 Mine Closure Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 84-689-3415-1 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Adsorption of copper cyanide species from tailings pond on flying ash; 1; AMD ISI | Wolkersdorfer; FG 'aha' 4 Abb., 6 Tab. Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17296 Serial 472
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Author (up) Becker, G.; Wade, S.; Riggins, J.D.; Cullen, T.B.; Venn, C.; Hallen, C.P.
Title Effect of Bast Mine treatment discharge on Big Mine Run AMD and Mahanoy Creek in the Western Middle Anthracite Field of Pennsylvania Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages
Keywords abandoned mines acid mine drainage anthracite Ashland Pennsylvania Bast Mine Big Mine Run coal coal fields coal mines Columbia County Pennsylvania discharge geochemistry hydrochemistry hydrology Mahanoy Creek mines Northumberland County Pennsylvania Pennsylvania pollution rivers and streams Schuylkill County Pennsylvania sedimentary rocks surface water United States water quality water treatment Western Middle Anthracite Field 22 Environmental geology 02A General geochemistry
Abstract The Bast Mine (reopened in 2001) and Big Mine are two anthracite coal mines near Ashland, PA, that were abandoned in the 1930's and that are now causing drastic and opposite effects on the water quality of the streams originating from them. To quantify these effects, multiple samples were taken at 5 different sites: 3 along Big Mine Run and 2 from Mahanoy Creek (1 upstream and 1 downstream of the confluence with Big Mine Run). At each site, one set of the samples was treated with nitric acid for metals survey, one set was acidified with sulfuric acid for nitrate preservation, one set was filtered for sulfate and phosphate tests, and one set was unaltered. Measurements of pH, TDS, dissolved oxygen, and temperature were made in the field. Alkalinity, acidity, hardness, nitrates, orthophosphates and sulfates were analyzed using Hach procedures. Selected metals (Fe, Ni, Mg, Ca, Cu, Zn, Hg, Pb) were analyzed utilizing flame atomic absorption spectroscopy. Drainage from the Bast Mine is actively treated with hydrated lime before the water is piped down to Big Mine Run. pH and alkalinity values were much higher at the outflow compared to those in the water with which it merged. The two waters could be visibly distinguished some distance downstream. pH values decreased, sulfate and dissolved iron increased and alkalinity was reduced to zero until the confluence with Mahanoy Creek. The high alkalinity, turbidity, TDS and calcium values in Mahanoy Creek were somewhat reduced downstream of the confluence with the much lower discharge Big Mine Run.
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Publisher Abstracts with Programs - Geological Society of America Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Geological Society of America, Northeastern Section, 40th annual meeting Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes 2006-042616; Geological Society of America, Northeastern Section, 40th annual meeting, Saratoga Springs, NY, United States, March 14-16, 2005; GeoRef; English Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 16455 Serial 459
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Author (up) Coulton, R.H.; Williams, K.P.
Title Active treatment of mine water; a European perspective Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Mine Water Env. Abbreviated Journal
Volume 24 Issue 1 Pages 23-26
Keywords abandoned mines; Europe; ground water; mines; mining; pollutants; pollution; protection; surface water; water pollution; water quality; water treatment 22, Environmental geology
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN 1025-9112 ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Active treatment of mine water; a European perspective; 2007-023995; illus. incl. 3 tables Federal Republic of Germany (DEU); GeoRef; English Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 5412 Serial 20
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Author (up) Greben, H.A.; Matshusa, M.P.; Maree, J.P.
Title Type Book Whole
Year 2005 Publication Abbreviated Journal
Volume Issue Pages 339-345
Keywords water pollution biological Sulphate removal technology sulphate acidity metals treatment technique
Abstract Mining is implicated as a significant contributor to water pollution, the prime reason being, that pyrites oxidize to sulphuric acid when exposed to air and water. Mine effluents, often containing sulphate, acidity and metals, should be treated to render it suitable for re-use in the mining industry, for irrigation of crops or for discharge in water bodies. This study describes the removal of all three mentioned pollutants in mine effluents, from different origins, containing different concentrations of various metals. The objectives were achieved, applying the biological sulphate removal technology, using ethanol as the carbon and energy source. It was shown that diluting the mine effluent with the effluent from the biological treatment, the pH increased due to the alkalinity in the treated water while the metals precipitated with the produced sulphide. When this treatment regime was changed and the mine water was fed undiluted, it was found that the metals stimulated the methanogenic bacteria (MB) as trace elements. This resulted in a high COD utilization of the MB, such that too little COD was available for the SRB. Metal removal in all three studies was observed and in most instances the metals were eliminated to the required disposal concentration.
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Publisher University of Oviedo Place of Publication Oviedo Editor Loredo, J.; Pendás, F.
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Mine Water 2005 Mine Closure Abbreviated Series Title
Series Volume Series Issue Edition
ISSN ISBN 84-689-3415-1 Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes The biological Sulphate removal technology; 1; AMD ISI | Wolkersdorfer; FG 'aha' 3 Abb., 9 Tab. Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 17347 Serial 367
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Author (up) Gusek, J.J.
Title Design challenges for large scale sulfate reducing bioreactors Type Journal Article
Year 2005 Publication Contaminated Soils, Sediments and Water: Science in the Real World, Vol 9 Abbreviated Journal
Volume 9 Issue Pages 33-44
Keywords mine water treatment
Abstract The first large-scale (1,200 gpm capacity), sulfate-reducing; bioreactor (SRBR) was constructed in 1996 to treat water from an underground lead mine in Missouri. Other large-scale SRBR systems have been built elsewhere since then. This technology holds much promise for economically treating heavy metals and has progressed steadily from the laboratory to industrial applications. Scale-up challenges include: designing for seasonal temperature variations, minimizing short circuits, changes in metal loading rate s, storm water impacts, and resistance to vandalism. However, the biggest challenge may be designing for the progressive biological degradation of the organic substrate and its effects on the hydraulics of the SRBR cells.
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Publisher Place of Publication Editor
Language Summary Language Original Title
Series Editor Series Title Abbreviated Series Title
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ISSN ISBN Medium
Area Expedition Conference
Notes Design challenges for large scale sulfate reducing bioreactors; Isip:000225303300004; Times Cited: 0; ISI Web of Science Approved no
Call Number CBU @ c.wolke @ 16959 Serial 156
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